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Re-Enable 2.0

Quickly repair your system after a virus attack

Rating:
(0)
Operating Systems:
Windows 7 (32 bit), Windows 7 (64 bit), Windows Vista, Windows XP
License:
Freeware
Developer:
Tangosoft
Software Cost:
Free
Category
Portable Applications
Date Updated:
14 July 2010
Downloads To Date:
2644
Languages:
English
Download Size:
773.00 KB

Re-Enable 2.0 is a small collection of handy tools that could help restore your PC to normal after a malware attack.

Some viruses will disable access to the Registry editor, Task Manager, Folder Options dialog and other system areas. And these tweaks won't necessarily be undone by your antivirus software. This isn't a problem with Re-Enable, though - just launch the program, click the Re-Enable button, and it will remove any restrictions on 12 of the most commonly affected Windows components.

Explore the Tools menu and you'll discover further useful options. There's a quick link to edit your HOSTS file, for instance. You get tools to repair faulty desktop Registry settings, and fix Explorer startup problems, while another looks for hidden drives and restores them to full view.

And the program is completed with a set of links to Windows components that just might come in useful: System Restore, the Group Policy Editor, Registry Editor, MSCONFIG and more.

Verdict:

It really needs a Help file, but even without this, Re-Enable provides some useful shortcuts to help you get a poorly configured PC working normally again.

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